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How to Spot Planet Venus in the Sky
Pictured above: The Moon and Venus shine in the skies of Cerro Paranal, home of ESO’s Very Large Telescope (VLT). Below them, the Milky Way glows crimson.
Here’s a nifty little guide courtesy of SPACE, detailing how you can spot planet Venus any time in night sky. It also specifies how it will look to the unaided eye or a telescope and why. Here’s an excerpt from the article I particularly liked;
When Venus is on the opposite side of the sun from us, it appears full (or nearly so) and rather small because it is far from us. But because Venus moves with a greater velocity around the sun than Earth, it gradually gets closer and looms progressively larger in apparent size; the angle of sunlight striking it as seen from our Earthly vantage point also appears to change as well.
Ultimately, as Venus prepares to pass between the Earth and the sun, it appears as a thinning crescent.  And since, at this point in its orbit, it is nearly six times closer to us compared to when it was on the opposite side of the sun, Venus appears much larger to us as well.
They also provide a schedule of how Venus’ appearance will change during the coming months. Be sure to check out the guide in full details and don’t be shy to put it to use tonight or any other night!

How to Spot Planet Venus in the Sky

Pictured above: The Moon and Venus shine in the skies of Cerro Paranal, home of ESO’s Very Large Telescope (VLT). Below them, the Milky Way glows crimson.

Here’s a nifty little guide courtesy of SPACE, detailing how you can spot planet Venus any time in night sky. It also specifies how it will look to the unaided eye or a telescope and why. Here’s an excerpt from the article I particularly liked;

When Venus is on the opposite side of the sun from us, it appears full (or nearly so) and rather small because it is far from us. But because Venus moves with a greater velocity around the sun than Earth, it gradually gets closer and looms progressively larger in apparent size; the angle of sunlight striking it as seen from our Earthly vantage point also appears to change as well.

Ultimately, as Venus prepares to pass between the Earth and the sun, it appears as a thinning crescent. And since, at this point in its orbit, it is nearly six times closer to us compared to when it was on the opposite side of the sun, Venus appears much larger to us as well.

They also provide a schedule of how Venus’ appearance will change during the coming months. Be sure to check out the guide in full details and don’t be shy to put it to use tonight or any other night!

(via scinerds)

Filed under astronomy venus space education planets

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npr:

usagov:

This image of space shuttle Atlantis was taken shortly after the rotating service structure was rolled back at Launch Pad 39A, Thursday, July 7, 2011. Atlantis is set to liftoff today, Friday, July 8, at 11:26 a.m. EDT on the final flight of the Space Shuttle Program.
Watch the launch as it happens on NASA.gov.

We also have a nice video retrospective of the shuttle program over at NPR.org. —Wright

npr:

usagov:

This image of space shuttle Atlantis was taken shortly after the rotating service structure was rolled back at Launch Pad 39A, Thursday, July 7, 2011. Atlantis is set to liftoff today, Friday, July 8, at 11:26 a.m. EDT on the final flight of the Space Shuttle Program.

Watch the launch as it happens on NASA.gov.

We also have a nice video retrospective of the shuttle program over at NPR.org. —Wright

Filed under Atlantis NASA flight missions space space shuttle videos NPR

9,480 notes

abcworldnews:

A Discover blog pointed out this one-of-a-kind image of the moon, compiled from about 1,300 separate images taken over two weeks from the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter’s wide-angle camera.
Discover calls it the highest resolution picture ever taken of the near side of the moon.

abcworldnews:

A Discover blog pointed out this one-of-a-kind image of the moon, compiled from about 1,300 separate images taken over two weeks from the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter’s wide-angle camera.

Discover calls it the highest resolution picture ever taken of the near side of the moon.

Filed under moon NASA space photos

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inothernews:

FLASH PHOTOGRAPHY   On Valentine’s Day (ET) the Sun unleashed one of its most powerful explosions, an X-class flare.  The blast was the largest so far in the new solar cycle.  Erupting from active region AR1158 in the Sun’s southern hemisphere, the flare is captured here in this extreme ultraviolet image from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO).  The intense burst of electromagnetic radiation momentarily overwhelmed pixels in SDO’s detectors causing the bright vertical blemish.  This X-class flare was also accompanied by a coronal mass ejection (CME), a massive cloud of charged particles traveling outward at nearly 900 kilometers per second.  (Photo: APOD / NASA)

inothernews:

FLASH PHOTOGRAPHY   On Valentine’s Day (ET) the Sun unleashed one of its most powerful explosions, an X-class flare. The blast was the largest so far in the new solar cycle. Erupting from active region AR1158 in the Sun’s southern hemisphere, the flare is captured here in this extreme ultraviolet image from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). The intense burst of electromagnetic radiation momentarily overwhelmed pixels in SDO’s detectors causing the bright vertical blemish. This X-class flare was also accompanied by a coronal mass ejection (CME), a massive cloud of charged particles traveling outward at nearly 900 kilometers per second.  (Photo: APOD / NASA)

Filed under NASA sun space photos photography Astronomy solar flare