media girl

Capturing bits & pieces on media, politics, culture & daily life

Posts tagged social media

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Nice video from HootSuite. 

Social media is about connecting people and sharing information. The video tells a story of how sharing a single update can spark a larger conversation — between a student, a baker and bank.

Filed under social media twitter hootsuite videos

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latimes:

One photographer’s return to FlickrFlickr has recently fallen by the wayside as newer photography upstarts like Instagram and even Google+, but with Yahoo now throwing its weight around (something we Tumblr folks should be well aware of) the longstanding site has been given some new features like a new interface and 1 TB of free storage.
And our own photographer, Robert Lachman, has been drawn back into the fold after a two-year absence from the site. So far, he’s enjoying the revisions, and wrote about his newfound appreciation for Flickr over at Framework.
Photo: Robert Lachman / Flickr

latimes:

One photographer’s return to Flickr

Flickr has recently fallen by the wayside as newer photography upstarts like Instagram and even Google+, but with Yahoo now throwing its weight around (something we Tumblr folks should be well aware of) the longstanding site has been given some new features like a new interface and 1 TB of free storage.

And our own photographer, Robert Lachman, has been drawn back into the fold after a two-year absence from the site. So far, he’s enjoying the revisions, and wrote about his newfound appreciation for Flickr over at Framework.

Photo: Robert Lachman / Flickr

Filed under photos flickr social media photography

218 notes

The hardest part of this was how far from any actual evidence there actually was, and how quickly and how painfully this traveled…We find it incredibly unfortunate that media outlets were so quick to jump without checking with authorities, but we hope they use the same energy and intensity they showed in the past 24 hours to really help us find Sunil.
We spoke with Sangeeta Tripathi, whose innocent brother Sunil was made into a Boston Marathon bombing suspect by social media and news organizations. (via motherjones)

Filed under Sunil Tripathi boston marathon boston bombings media social media

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Western media did more than its fair share of romanticizing the Arab Spring, including places like Tahrir Square. Yes, historic things were happening before our eyes, but it’s easy to get swept up by romantic narratives, or over-rely on sources who speak English and are well educated. I think we also often oversimplified how complex these situations are. It’s hard to understand any revolution with nothing but soundbites.

NPR’s Andy Carvin on how he used social media o cover the Arab revolutions

Half a century before the age of the social media soundbite, Susan Sontag worried about how aphorisms rob cultural commentary of dimension

(via explore-blog)

(Source: , via explore-blog)

Filed under media social media journalism

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storyboard:

Meet the Mind Behind Barack Obama’s Online Persona
You’ve most definitely seen it by now. Michelle Obama, wearing a red-and-white checkered dress, stands with her back to the camera. Her arms are wrapped around her husband, the hints of a smile lingering on the edges of his lips. “Four more years,” reads the text, which was posted on the Obama campaign’s social media accounts around 11:15pm on election night‚ just as it became clear the president had won a second term. 
The photo, taken by campaign photographer Scout Tufankjian just a few days into the job, pretty much won the internet: 816,000 retweets, the most likes ever on Facebook; thousands of reblogs on Tumblr. And yet it wasn’t chosen by the president’s press secretary, or even a senior-level operative, but by 31-year-old Laura Olin, a social media strategist who’d been up since 4am. For the first time since the campaign ended, she talked to Tumblr, in partnership with The Daily Beast, about what it’s like being the voice of the President — where millions of people, and a ravenous press, await your every grammatical error.
So how does it actually work, being the voice of the President? Who makes the decisions about what to post?
All of our decisions were made in-house — in Chicago, mostly — so we weren’t getting direct directives from the White House or anything. But we tried as much as possible to have voices for each account, so depending on the message — because we had all these channels — we had an appropriate place to put it. Obviously some stuff was sufficiently huge so that it went everywhere, but as much as possible we tried to tailor the message for the channel and the audience.
It must be daunting.
It was kind of terrifying, actually. My team ran the Barack Obama Twitter handle, which I think was probably most susceptible to really embarrassing and silly mistakes. We didn’t ever really have one, which I still can’t believe we pulled off.
Read More

storyboard:

Meet the Mind Behind Barack Obama’s Online Persona

You’ve most definitely seen it by now. Michelle Obama, wearing a red-and-white checkered dress, stands with her back to the camera. Her arms are wrapped around her husband, the hints of a smile lingering on the edges of his lips. “Four more years,” reads the text, which was posted on the Obama campaign’s social media accounts around 11:15pm on election night‚ just as it became clear the president had won a second term. 

The photo, taken by campaign photographer Scout Tufankjian just a few days into the job, pretty much won the internet: 816,000 retweets, the most likes ever on Facebook; thousands of reblogs on Tumblr. And yet it wasn’t chosen by the president’s press secretary, or even a senior-level operative, but by 31-year-old Laura Olin, a social media strategist who’d been up since 4am. For the first time since the campaign ended, she talked to Tumblr, in partnership with The Daily Beast, about what it’s like being the voice of the President — where millions of people, and a ravenous press, await your every grammatical error.

So how does it actually work, being the voice of the President? Who makes the decisions about what to post?

All of our decisions were made in-house — in Chicago, mostly — so we weren’t getting direct directives from the White House or anything. But we tried as much as possible to have voices for each account, so depending on the message — because we had all these channels — we had an appropriate place to put it. Obviously some stuff was sufficiently huge so that it went everywhere, but as much as possible we tried to tailor the message for the channel and the audience.

It must be daunting.

It was kind of terrifying, actually. My team ran the Barack Obama Twitter handle, which I think was probably most susceptible to really embarrassing and silly mistakes. We didn’t ever really have one, which I still can’t believe we pulled off.

Read More

Filed under social media election 2012 obama twitter

74 notes

futurejournalismproject:

Infographic: How Social Media is Replacing Traditional Journalism for Breaking News
via Bill Moyers:

As of 2012, online news revenue has surpassed print news revenue, and more people are using social media tools like Facebook and Twitter for news than ever before. This infographic shows that nearly half of all Americans get their news from online sources at least three times a week. Learn more about how social media is supplanting traditional media in today’s smart chart.

H/T: Schools.com

futurejournalismproject:

Infographic: How Social Media is Replacing Traditional Journalism for Breaking News

via Bill Moyers:

As of 2012, online news revenue has surpassed print news revenue, and more people are using social media tools like Facebook and Twitter for news than ever before. This infographic shows that nearly half of all Americans get their news from online sources at least three times a week. Learn more about how social media is supplanting traditional media in today’s smart chart.

H/T: Schools.com

Filed under social media journalism breaking news

12 notes

Say you’re using a restaurant search app, and you’re aware that it’s using your GPS location to help find businesses near you. You’re OK with that. But perhaps the app doesn’t also tell you that it’s using your location for another purpose: to help advertisers better create a profile of you for targeted advertising.

Christina Bonnington on How Location-Based Apps Can Stave Off the ‘Creepy Factor’

FJP: Related is our post last week on the creepy app, Girls Around Me. Foursquare since revoked access to its API and the app was removed from the app store by its developers…for now.

The Big Question: What can be done to make users feel more comfortable sharing their information, especially when secondary uses of data (that are seemingly unrelated to an app’s functionality) remain unknown.

Bonnington suggests:

Thus, transparency and user control are key to keeping an app from coming across as untrustworthy or creepy. Developers already have the tools to make sure users are aware of geolocation features in apps, and it’s incumbent on them to use them.

Mobile devices could also employ “ambient notice” features to let users know when location data is being shared. For example, when you’re using your iPhone’s compass, you can see the phone’s arrow symbol and know your device is currently using that feature. Similar signposting could be used for location services. (via Wired)


Thoughts?

Filed under gps geotagging social media privacy