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Posts tagged obama

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newshour:

“One year later, we also stand in awe of the men and women who continue to inspire us — learning to stand, walk, dance and run again. With each new step our country is moved by the resilience of a community and a city.” - President Obama
Vice President Joe Biden, Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick, Boston Mayor Martin J. Walsh and former Boston Mayor Thomas M. Menino will pay tribute to the victims of the Boston Marathon bombings today at 12 p.m. ET. Watch here.

newshour:

One year later, we also stand in awe of the men and women who continue to inspire us — learning to stand, walk, dance and run again. With each new step our country is moved by the resilience of a community and a city.” - President Obama

Vice President Joe Biden, Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick, Boston Mayor Martin J. Walsh and former Boston Mayor Thomas M. Menino will pay tribute to the victims of the Boston Marathon bombings today at 12 p.m. ET. Watch here.

Filed under boston strong obama

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Obama's broken promises on transparency

Since 2009, the Obama administration has prosecuted more people as whistleblowers under the 1917 Espionage Act than all former presidents combined, a fact often rehashed in journalistic circles. In some of those cases, officials seized journalists’ phone and email records to use in their investigation. James Goodale, who was The New York Times’ chief counsel during Pentagon Papers coverage, has told CJR that Obama’s aggressive crackdown on whistleblowers is “antediluvian, conservative, backwards. Worse than Nixon. He thinks that anyone who leaks is a spy! I mean, it’s cuckoo.”

With all this in mind, former Washington Post editor Leonard Downie Jr. has written an engrossing report for the Committee to Protect Journalists, released Thursday, called “The Obama Administration and the Press.” It tells the story of the post 9/11 rise in US national security and surveillance infrastructure and the concurrent rise in an environment hostile to reporting. Though the information is anecdotal rather than quantitative, the report paints a damning picture of a candidate who promised transparency and then, as president, offered anything but.

“The administration’s war on leaks and other efforts to control information are the most aggressive I’ve seen since the Nixon administration,” Downie wrote in the report’s introduction. “The 30 experienced Washington journalists at a variety of new publications whom I interviewed for this report could not remember any precedent.”

(Source: azspot)

Filed under obama transparency whistleblowers cpj

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We know that America thrives when every person can find independence and pride in their work; when the wages of honest labor liberate families from the brink of hardship. We are true to our creed when a little girl born into the bleakest poverty knows that she has the same chance to succeed as anybody else, because she is an American, she is free, and she is equal, not just in the eyes of God but also in our own.
President Obama in his Inauguration speech, as prepared. You can watch here. (via newsweek)

Filed under obama inaug2013 quotes

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apsies:

Cristina Hassinger, the daughter of Sandy Hook Principal Dawn Hochsprung, tweeted this picture of President Obama holding her daughter before the interfaith service this evening.
Hassinger tweeted the following yesterday: My mom, Dawn Hochsprung, was taken tragically from me. But she went down in a blaze of glory that truly represents who she was. #Newtown

apsies:

Cristina Hassinger, the daughter of Sandy Hook Principal Dawn Hochsprung, tweeted this picture of President Obama holding her daughter before the interfaith service this evening.

Hassinger tweeted the following yesterday: My mom, Dawn Hochsprung, was taken tragically from me. But she went down in a blaze of glory that truly represents who she was.

Filed under obama twitter newtown

354 notes

theatlantic:

“We’re going to have to come together and take meaningful action to prevent more tragedies like this, regardless of the politics,” Obama said during a brief address from the White House, where he repeatedly wiped away tears.

“We’ve endured too many of these tragedies in the past few years. Each time I learn the news, I react not as a president, but as anybody else would, as a parent. And that is especially true today.”

(via braiker)

Filed under newtown shootings obama

2,807 notes

storyboard:

Meet the Mind Behind Barack Obama’s Online Persona
You’ve most definitely seen it by now. Michelle Obama, wearing a red-and-white checkered dress, stands with her back to the camera. Her arms are wrapped around her husband, the hints of a smile lingering on the edges of his lips. “Four more years,” reads the text, which was posted on the Obama campaign’s social media accounts around 11:15pm on election night‚ just as it became clear the president had won a second term. 
The photo, taken by campaign photographer Scout Tufankjian just a few days into the job, pretty much won the internet: 816,000 retweets, the most likes ever on Facebook; thousands of reblogs on Tumblr. And yet it wasn’t chosen by the president’s press secretary, or even a senior-level operative, but by 31-year-old Laura Olin, a social media strategist who’d been up since 4am. For the first time since the campaign ended, she talked to Tumblr, in partnership with The Daily Beast, about what it’s like being the voice of the President — where millions of people, and a ravenous press, await your every grammatical error.
So how does it actually work, being the voice of the President? Who makes the decisions about what to post?
All of our decisions were made in-house — in Chicago, mostly — so we weren’t getting direct directives from the White House or anything. But we tried as much as possible to have voices for each account, so depending on the message — because we had all these channels — we had an appropriate place to put it. Obviously some stuff was sufficiently huge so that it went everywhere, but as much as possible we tried to tailor the message for the channel and the audience.
It must be daunting.
It was kind of terrifying, actually. My team ran the Barack Obama Twitter handle, which I think was probably most susceptible to really embarrassing and silly mistakes. We didn’t ever really have one, which I still can’t believe we pulled off.
Read More

storyboard:

Meet the Mind Behind Barack Obama’s Online Persona

You’ve most definitely seen it by now. Michelle Obama, wearing a red-and-white checkered dress, stands with her back to the camera. Her arms are wrapped around her husband, the hints of a smile lingering on the edges of his lips. “Four more years,” reads the text, which was posted on the Obama campaign’s social media accounts around 11:15pm on election night‚ just as it became clear the president had won a second term. 

The photo, taken by campaign photographer Scout Tufankjian just a few days into the job, pretty much won the internet: 816,000 retweets, the most likes ever on Facebook; thousands of reblogs on Tumblr. And yet it wasn’t chosen by the president’s press secretary, or even a senior-level operative, but by 31-year-old Laura Olin, a social media strategist who’d been up since 4am. For the first time since the campaign ended, she talked to Tumblr, in partnership with The Daily Beast, about what it’s like being the voice of the President — where millions of people, and a ravenous press, await your every grammatical error.

So how does it actually work, being the voice of the President? Who makes the decisions about what to post?

All of our decisions were made in-house — in Chicago, mostly — so we weren’t getting direct directives from the White House or anything. But we tried as much as possible to have voices for each account, so depending on the message — because we had all these channels — we had an appropriate place to put it. Obviously some stuff was sufficiently huge so that it went everywhere, but as much as possible we tried to tailor the message for the channel and the audience.

It must be daunting.

It was kind of terrifying, actually. My team ran the Barack Obama Twitter handle, which I think was probably most susceptible to really embarrassing and silly mistakes. We didn’t ever really have one, which I still can’t believe we pulled off.

Read More

Filed under social media election 2012 obama twitter