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Posts tagged new york times

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futurejournalismproject:

New York Times Staffers Stage Walkout Over Contract Negotiations
Huffington Post with the story.
For background, see Jim Romenesko here and here.
One of the oddities is that the Times, after working to combine its print and digital operations, is proposing separate contracts for print and digital reporters.
In a memo to colleagues, the Newspaper Guild at the New York Times writes, “Any proposal to dismantle the decade of work that has been done to unify the newsroom, securing its place as the world’s premier news organization, could be laughed off as far-fetched legal gimmickry. After all, that would be an act of self-immolation. But even if it’s not worth serious consideration, it has landed just we are heading at full speed toward a crisis over genuine issues like our pay and benefits.”

futurejournalismproject:

New York Times Staffers Stage Walkout Over Contract Negotiations

Huffington Post with the story.

For background, see Jim Romenesko here and here.

One of the oddities is that the Times, after working to combine its print and digital operations, is proposing separate contracts for print and digital reporters.

In a memo to colleagues, the Newspaper Guild at the New York Times writes, “Any proposal to dismantle the decade of work that has been done to unify the newsroom, securing its place as the world’s premier news organization, could be laughed off as far-fetched legal gimmickry. After all, that would be an act of self-immolation. But even if it’s not worth serious consideration, it has landed just we are heading at full speed toward a crisis over genuine issues like our pay and benefits.”

(via onaissues)

Filed under new york times journalism

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Village Voice profits from prostitution advertising

Backpage.com accounts for about 70 percent of prostitution advertising among five Web sites that carry such ads in the United States, earning more than $22 million annually from prostitution ads, according to AIM Group, a media research and consulting company. It is now the premier Web site for human trafficking in the United States, according to the National Association of Attorneys General. And it’s not a fly-by-night operation. Backpage is owned by Village Voice Media, which also owns the estimable Village Voice newspaper.

… Village Voice began as an alternative newspaper to speak truth to power. It publishes some superb journalism. So it’s sad to see it accept business from pimps in the greediest and most depraved kind of exploitation.

Where Pimps Peddle Their Goods 

Filed under media village voice new york times human trafficking

390 notes

kateoplis:

The New York Times has had it with the NYPD blocking its photographers at | The Atlantic

New York Police officers continue to interfere with photographers and reporters trying to cover news, and a New York Times photographer who was prevented from shooting an arrest at an Occupy Wall Street rally last weekend said police had reason to hide their actions from the press.
The department’s treatment of reporters in the field has been so bad, media outlets say, that 13 news organizations signed a second letter to the New York Police Department from a New York Timeslawyer on Wednesday, demanding responses and follow-up after their first scathing criticism of the department’s handling of the press. The new complaint to police comes after two officers prevented Times freelance photographer Robert Stolarik from photographing a protester’s arrest at Sunday’s rally in support of Occupy Oakland, the letter says. The letter, which Capital New York posted in full, cites a Times story that reported “officers blocked the lens of a newspaper photographer attempting to document the arrests.” […]
We’ve reached out to the New York Police Department for comment, and will update this account when they respond.

kateoplis:

The New York Times has had it with the NYPD blocking its photographers at | The Atlantic

New York Police officers continue to interfere with photographers and reporters trying to cover news, and a New York Times photographer who was prevented from shooting an arrest at an Occupy Wall Street rally last weekend said police had reason to hide their actions from the press.

The department’s treatment of reporters in the field has been so bad, media outlets say, that 13 news organizations signed a second letter to the New York Police Department from a New York Timeslawyer on Wednesday, demanding responses and follow-up after their first scathing criticism of the department’s handling of the press. The new complaint to police comes after two officers prevented Times freelance photographer Robert Stolarik from photographing a protester’s arrest at Sunday’s rally in support of Occupy Oakland, the letter says. The letter, which Capital New York posted in full, cites a Times story that reported “officers blocked the lens of a newspaper photographer attempting to document the arrests.” […]

We’ve reached out to the New York Police Department for comment, and will update this account when they respond.

(via think4yourself)

Filed under nypd media occupy wall street new york times

55 notes

shortformblog:

RIP Louis Silverstein, the guy who gave The New York Times its shine
An unsung journalistic hero: Before Louis Silverstein, newspaper design was a trade, not a profession. With the many changes he made as art director of the Times in the 1960s and 1970s, he helped change that. White space? More ambitious typefaces? Larger fonts? Abstract illustrations? Those were all his doing. Many of the conventions that modern newspapers now take advantage of came (in part) from Silverstein’s work. It took a lot of pushing, but Silverstein sold editors on these ideas. As a result, the Gray Lady is (and many other papers are) a lot less gray. And graphic design and news aren’t separate entities. Silverstein died Thursday at 92. (Also worth a read:The Society for News Design has a lot of anecdotes about an important figure in visual journalism.) source
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shortformblog:

An unsung journalistic hero: Before Louis Silverstein, newspaper design was a trade, not a profession. With the many changes he made as art director of the Times in the 1960s and 1970s, he helped change that. White space? More ambitious typefaces? Larger fonts? Abstract illustrations? Those were all his doing. Many of the conventions that modern newspapers now take advantage of came (in part) from Silverstein’s work. It took a lot of pushing, but Silverstein sold editors on these ideas. As a result, the Gray Lady is (and many other papers are) a lot less gray. And graphic design and news aren’t separate entities. Silverstein died Thursday at 92. (Also worth a read:The Society for News Design has a lot of anecdotes about an important figure in visual journalism.) source

Follow ShortFormBlog

(Source: shortformblog)

Filed under Louis Silverstein journalism new york times 2011 rips

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abbyjean:

Last year, more than one in 10 families received food stamps, with some states having significantly higher participation rates. In Oregon, the share was nearly one in five. Here’s a map showing what share of families in each state received these benefits to help them buy food. (via NYTimes.com)

abbyjean:

Last year, more than one in 10 families received food stamps, with some states having significantly higher participation rates. In Oregon, the share was nearly one in five. Here’s a map showing what share of families in each state received these benefits to help them buy food. (via NYTimes.com)

Filed under food stamps maps new york times snap

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futurejournalismproject:

Shan Carter and Amanda Cox of the New York Times explore the total financial cost of Al Qaeda’s 9/11 attack ten years ago. In today’s dollar, their final tally is $3.3 trillion in and by the United States alone:

Al Qaeda spent roughly half a million dollars to destroy the World Trade Center and cripple the Pentagon. What has been the cost to the United States? In a survey of estimates by The New York Times, the answer is $3.3 trillion, or about $7 million for every dollar Al Qaeda spent planning and executing the attacks. While not all of the costs have been borne by the government — and some are still to come — this total equals one-fifth of the current national debt.

The interactive from which the above screenshot is taken explores war (and future war) funding, homeland security, economic consequences, veterans care and actual physical damage from the attacks.

futurejournalismproject:

Shan Carter and Amanda Cox of the New York Times explore the total financial cost of Al Qaeda’s 9/11 attack ten years ago. In today’s dollar, their final tally is $3.3 trillion in and by the United States alone:

Al Qaeda spent roughly half a million dollars to destroy the World Trade Center and cripple the Pentagon. What has been the cost to the United States? In a survey of estimates by The New York Times, the answer is $3.3 trillion, or about $7 million for every dollar Al Qaeda spent planning and executing the attacks. While not all of the costs have been borne by the government — and some are still to come — this total equals one-fifth of the current national debt.

The interactive from which the above screenshot is taken explores war (and future war) funding, homeland security, economic consequences, veterans care and actual physical damage from the attacks.

(Source: futurejournalismproject, via journo-geekery)

Filed under 9/11 costs economy infographics news new york times