media girl

Capturing bits & pieces on media, politics, culture & daily life

Posts tagged media

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futurejournalismproject:

Behind the Scenes of the Dzhokhar Tsarnaev Arrest
A Massachusetts police photographer upset with the glamorization of Dzhokhar Tsarnaev on the cover of the current edition of Rolling Stone released behind the scenes images of the Boston Marathon bombing investigation and arrest of the suspect.
According to the BBC, the photo release was unauthorized and Murphy is currently under investigation. John Wolfson, the author of the Boston Magazine article that displays the photos, tweeted that Murphy has been “relieved of duty.”
Image: A sniper trains his gun on Dzhokhar Tsarnaev. One of a series of photographs released by Sean Murphy to Boston Magazine. Select to embiggen.

futurejournalismproject:

Behind the Scenes of the Dzhokhar Tsarnaev Arrest

A Massachusetts police photographer upset with the glamorization of Dzhokhar Tsarnaev on the cover of the current edition of Rolling Stone released behind the scenes images of the Boston Marathon bombing investigation and arrest of the suspect.

According to the BBC, the photo release was unauthorized and Murphy is currently under investigation. John Wolfson, the author of the Boston Magazine article that displays the photos, tweeted that Murphy has been “relieved of duty.”

Image: A sniper trains his gun on Dzhokhar Tsarnaev. One of a series of photographs released by Sean Murphy to Boston Magazine. Select to embiggen.

Filed under dzhokhar tsarnaev boston marathon photography media rolling stone

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Many women are left with scars, stretch marks, and loose skin after giving birth. It’s a reality that women themselves often try to hide and the media never wants to show. But photographer Jade Beall is trying to change that.
One day early last year, Beall — a new mother based in Tucson, Arizona — went into her studio with her five-week-old baby, stripped off, and took a series of photos. It was a body she wasn’t really familiar with. There were bumps and lumps that she had never had before her pregnancy. And she didn’t like what she saw.
But she decided to post the pictures on her photography blog — to share with others a side of motherhood that tends to be kept out of view… and it went viral.
Beall has now photographed more than 70 mothers who will appear in her book, A Beautiful Body, due out in January. See photos here.
— BBC: Are women’s bodies still beautiful after pregnancy?

Many women are left with scars, stretch marks, and loose skin after giving birth. It’s a reality that women themselves often try to hide and the media never wants to show. But photographer Jade Beall is trying to change that.

One day early last year, Beall — a new mother based in Tucson, Arizona — went into her studio with her five-week-old baby, stripped off, and took a series of photos. It was a body she wasn’t really familiar with. There were bumps and lumps that she had never had before her pregnancy. And she didn’t like what she saw.

But she decided to post the pictures on her photography blog — to share with others a side of motherhood that tends to be kept out of view… and it went viral.

Beall has now photographed more than 70 mothers who will appear in her book, A Beautiful Body, due out in January. See photos here.

— BBC: Are women’s bodies still beautiful after pregnancy?

Filed under post pregnancy women media

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The song “Happy Birthday to You” is widely credited for being the most performed song in the world. But one of its latest venues may be the federal courthouse in Manhattan, where the only parties may be the litigants to a new legal battle.

The dispute stems from a lawsuit filed on Thursday by a filmmaker in New York who is seeking to have the court declare the popular ditty to be in the public domain, and to block a music company from claiming it owns the copyright to the song and charging licensing fees for its use.

The filmmaker, Jennifer Nelson, was producing a documentary movie, tentatively titled “Happy Birthday,” about the song, the lawsuit said. In one proposed scene, the song was to be performed.

But to use it in the film, she was told she would have to pay $1,500 and enter into a licensing agreement with Warner/Chappell, the publishing arm of the Warner Music Group. Ms. Nelson’s company, Good Morning to You Productions, paid the fee and entered into the agreement, the suit says.

“Before I began my filmmaking career,” Ms. Nelson said in an e-mail forwarded by her lawyer, “I never thought the song was owned by anyone. I thought it belonged to everyone.”

The lawsuit notes that in the late 1800s, two sisters, Mildred J. Hill and Patty Smith Hill, wrote a song with the same melody called “Good Morning to All.” The suit tracks that song’s evolution into the familiar birthday song, and its ownership over more than a century.

But although Warner/Chappell claims ownership of “Happy Birthday to You,” the song was “just a public adaptation” of the original song, one of Ms. Nelson’s lawyers, Mark C. Rifkin, said in a phone interview.

“It’s a song created by the public, it belongs to the public, and it needs to go back to the public,” Mr. Rifkin said.

The New York Times, “Birthday Song’s Copyright Leads to a Lawsuit for the Ages.”

(via inothernews)

Filed under happy birthday copyright media music

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The incomparable A. J. Liebling wrote once that there are three kinds of journalists: the reporter, who says what he’s seen; the interpretive reporter, who says what he thinks is the meaning of what he’s seen; and the expert, who says what he thinks is the meaning of what he hasn’t seen. The first two—reporters and interpretive reporters—have been largely undermined by economics and incuriosity. But the third category never stops growing. We are now a nation of experts, with millions of people who know the meaning of everything that they haven’t actually experienced.
Adam Gopnik, The New Yorker (via @LineHolm1)

(Source: soupsoup)

Filed under journalism media

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All the elements just seemed right with Circa—that they’re embarking on something new, that they’re trying to do something no one else has done before, and that they look at news presentation in the same way—that it’s broken—as I do, and they want to fix it. That’s something I always wanted to focus on and make something I do—it’s something I jump out of bed and think about.
-Anthony De Rosa, Reuters’ social media editor, is leaving to join the news startup Circa. He shared with us why he’s leaving, and what he plans to do when he gets there. (via fastcompany)

Filed under news media tech startups circa

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At Bloomberg, reporters could sit at their desks and use a keyboard function to see the last time an official of the Federal Reserve logged on. And the Justice Department obtained the records of The Associated Press from phone companies with no advance notice, giving it no chance to challenge the action. The absence of friction has led to a culture of transgression. Clearly, if it can be known, it will be known.
David Carr, Snooping and the news media: it’s a two way street (via soupsoup)

Filed under Bloomberg Associated Press media privacy

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Telling the news on Twitter is different than telling the news in a magazine or newspaper. I realize journalists have a difficult job these days. The way mistakes are made and disseminated and the way they are corrected, is utterly different on Twitter than at a magazine like Wired or a newspaper like the New York Times. This places unfamiliar demands on journalists and novel demands on consumers of news. And the bigger burden is on the consumers, which I imagine makes the journalists especially cross. Because if we consumers want to have a real-time account of events—and we do, it really makes us a better informed citizenry—we have to understand how to deal better with ambiguity.
Nick Kallen, on Mat Honan’s desire for the ability to edit tweets (via couch)

(via journo-geekery)

Filed under twitter media

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comedycentral:

In one week, Comedy Central and Twitter will launch the first ever #ComedyFest, a five-day celebration of comedy taking place on Twitter and featuring Mel Brooks, Carl Reiner, Judd Apatow, Gabriel Iglesias, Keegan-Michael Key, Jordan Peele, The Cast of RENO 911!, Amy Schumer, Jeff Ross, Doug Benson, Steve Agee, Paul Feig, Neal Brennan, Al Madrigal and many others!
The festival kicks off next Monday with the one and only Mel Brooks joining Twitter. His first tweet will be a live-stream of an event at LA’s Paley Center with Brooks and Carl Reiner, moderated by Judd Apatow.
Altogether, #ComedyFest will include 16 programmed events featuring more than 50 comedians. Be sure to follow @ComedyCentral on Twitter for updates.
Click through for the full lineup.
Read More

comedycentral:

In one week, Comedy Central and Twitter will launch the first ever #ComedyFest, a five-day celebration of comedy taking place on Twitter and featuring Mel Brooks, Carl Reiner, Judd Apatow, Gabriel Iglesias, Keegan-Michael Key, Jordan Peele, The Cast of RENO 911!, Amy Schumer, Jeff Ross, Doug Benson, Steve Agee, Paul Feig, Neal Brennan, Al Madrigal and many others!

The festival kicks off next Monday with the one and only Mel Brooks joining Twitter. His first tweet will be a live-stream of an event at LA’s Paley Center with Brooks and Carl Reiner, moderated by Judd Apatow.

Altogether, #ComedyFest will include 16 programmed events featuring more than 50 comedians. Be sure to follow @ComedyCentral on Twitter for updates.

Click through for the full lineup.

Read More

Filed under comedy comedyfest media twitter

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The hardest part of this was how far from any actual evidence there actually was, and how quickly and how painfully this traveled…We find it incredibly unfortunate that media outlets were so quick to jump without checking with authorities, but we hope they use the same energy and intensity they showed in the past 24 hours to really help us find Sunil.
We spoke with Sangeeta Tripathi, whose innocent brother Sunil was made into a Boston Marathon bombing suspect by social media and news organizations. (via motherjones)

Filed under Sunil Tripathi boston marathon boston bombings media social media

87 notes

futurejournalismproject:

Hello, Digital Public Library of America
The Digital Public Library of America launched today with “photographs, manuscripts, books, sounds, moving images, and more—from libraries, archives, and museums around the United States.”
Its goal is to create “an open, distributed network of comprehensive online resources that would draw on the nation’s living heritage from libraries, universities, archives, and museums in order to educate, inform, and empower everyone in current and future ­generations.”
Exhibitions are here. And your inner hacker can access the DPLA’s API here. Yes, the library has an API, which is awesome. One app currently using it is the Library Observatory:

Library Observatory is an interactive tool for searching and visualizing the DPLA collections, accompanied by an interactive documentary that weaves together history, visualizations, and audio about the making, use, and enduring significance of library data and the collections they describe.

Another app searches both the DPLA and Europeana, a European project similar to it, simultaneously giving results from each.
Start exploring.

futurejournalismproject:

Hello, Digital Public Library of America

The Digital Public Library of America launched today with “photographs, manuscripts, books, sounds, moving images, and more—from libraries, archives, and museums around the United States.”

Its goal is to create “an open, distributed network of comprehensive online resources that would draw on the nation’s living heritage from libraries, universities, archives, and museums in order to educate, inform, and empower everyone in current and future ­generations.”

Exhibitions are here. And your inner hacker can access the DPLA’s API here. Yes, the library has an API, which is awesome. One app currently using it is the Library Observatory:

Library Observatory is an interactive tool for searching and visualizing the DPLA collections, accompanied by an interactive documentary that weaves together history, visualizations, and audio about the making, use, and enduring significance of library data and the collections they describe.

Another app searches both the DPLA and Europeana, a European project similar to it, simultaneously giving results from each.

Start exploring.

Filed under libraries media digital digital public library of america

200 notes

futurejournalismproject:

Reporting Traumatic Events
Steven Gorelick, professor of media studies, Hunter College:

Be very careful about the experts you select as sources. These kinds of high-profile stories are magnets for everyone from legitimate scholars and practitioners to self-proclaimed “profilers.”
Serious experts are almost always quick to admit that there is no easy explanation for why and how something happened, especially before even the most basic information is released. Beware of the expert source who is just dying to be helpful. And perk up your ears when someone tells you: “I really need to get more information before I have anything useful to say.”

Scott Wallace, freelance journalist:

Despite the fact that we are all on deadline, you must take the time to breathe, empathize and feel the pain of survivors and loved ones whom you interview and come in contact with…
…Above all, forget trying to “scoop” your colleagues on this story. A spirit of cooperation should reign among the reporters, photographers and producers on a story like this. It may be useful to work in tandem with a colleague or two from some other media outlet, sharing the material and the experience of the interview rather than putting the same subject through it multiple times.


Lena Jakobsson, television producer:

Chasing victims’ family members down the street seems like a far more reasonable idea if CNN and MSNBC and FOX and all the nets are doing it, too, and you’re about to get yelled at if you don’t get that video. But you always have at least a few seconds to stop and listen to what your gut is telling you. Ratings come and go. The impact on your integrity, and on the people you’re covering — that stays.

Al Tompkins, Poynter

Clearly tell the public what you know and what you do not know. With a story like this — one that changes by the hour — do not assume the public is up to date…
…Acknowledge the emotional impact of the tragedy. Online conversations about the bombings, especially Twitter, have been loaded with people who are in distress, wondering what has become of humankind. Don’t underestimate that feeling. Spend some time and space honoring the good people who performed selfless acts in a time of crisis and beyond. Work with your local crisis lines, counselors and clergy, and stay in touch with the pulse of what they are hearing.

Dave Weigel, Slate:

In a situation like this, political reporters should probably make a quiet, temporary exit from the scene. There will be political angles in the reaction to this story, because this sort of nightmare knocks everything else out of the news cycle. Gosnell? Manchin-Toomey? Immigration? They’re in the middle of the paper if they’re anywhere. They’re paused, as is any speculation about the motivation for the attack. Who has ever speculated about that and not gone on to total, moronic infamy?

Jeremy Stahl, Slate

[D]on’t use a tragedy to make a political point before the facts are even known. Shortly after the attacks, New York Times columnist Nicholas Kristof tweeted this inanity: “explosion is a reminder that ATF needs a director. Shame on Senate Republicans for blocking apptment.” Probably realizing how his snarkiness sounded under the circumstances, Kristof quickly deleted the tweet and called it a “low blow.” On the right, Washington Post columnist Jennifer Rubin sent out this doozy, comparing the national media’s coverage of Boston to its alleged non-coverage of the Kermit Gosnell abortion case.

Image: A man after the explosions at the Boston Marathon, via Boston.com/AP.

futurejournalismproject:

Reporting Traumatic Events

Steven Gorelick, professor of media studies, Hunter College:

Be very careful about the experts you select as sources. These kinds of high-profile stories are magnets for everyone from legitimate scholars and practitioners to self-proclaimed “profilers.”

Serious experts are almost always quick to admit that there is no easy explanation for why and how something happened, especially before even the most basic information is released. Beware of the expert source who is just dying to be helpful. And perk up your ears when someone tells you: “I really need to get more information before I have anything useful to say.”

Scott Wallace, freelance journalist:

Despite the fact that we are all on deadline, you must take the time to breathe, empathize and feel the pain of survivors and loved ones whom you interview and come in contact with…

…Above all, forget trying to “scoop” your colleagues on this story. A spirit of cooperation should reign among the reporters, photographers and producers on a story like this. It may be useful to work in tandem with a colleague or two from some other media outlet, sharing the material and the experience of the interview rather than putting the same subject through it multiple times.

Lena Jakobsson, television producer:

Chasing victims’ family members down the street seems like a far more reasonable idea if CNN and MSNBC and FOX and all the nets are doing it, too, and you’re about to get yelled at if you don’t get that video. But you always have at least a few seconds to stop and listen to what your gut is telling you. Ratings come and go. The impact on your integrity, and on the people you’re covering — that stays.

Al Tompkins, Poynter

Clearly tell the public what you know and what you do not know. With a story like this — one that changes by the hour — do not assume the public is up to date…

…Acknowledge the emotional impact of the tragedy. Online conversations about the bombings, especially Twitter, have been loaded with people who are in distress, wondering what has become of humankind. Don’t underestimate that feeling. Spend some time and space honoring the good people who performed selfless acts in a time of crisis and beyond. Work with your local crisis lines, counselors and clergy, and stay in touch with the pulse of what they are hearing.

Dave Weigel, Slate:

In a situation like this, political reporters should probably make a quiet, temporary exit from the scene. There will be political angles in the reaction to this story, because this sort of nightmare knocks everything else out of the news cycle. Gosnell? Manchin-Toomey? Immigration? They’re in the middle of the paper if they’re anywhere. They’re paused, as is any speculation about the motivation for the attack. Who has ever speculated about that and not gone on to total, moronic infamy?

Jeremy Stahl, Slate

[D]on’t use a tragedy to make a political point before the facts are even known. Shortly after the attacks, New York Times columnist Nicholas Kristof tweeted this inanity: “explosion is a reminder that ATF needs a director. Shame on Senate Republicans for blocking apptment.” Probably realizing how his snarkiness sounded under the circumstances, Kristof quickly deleted the tweet and called it a “low blow.” On the right, Washington Post columnist Jennifer Rubin sent out this doozy, comparing the national media’s coverage of Boston to its alleged non-coverage of the Kermit Gosnell abortion case.

Image: A man after the explosions at the Boston Marathon, via Boston.com/AP.

Filed under media trauma reporting