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Capturing bits & pieces on media, politics, culture & daily life

Posts tagged maps

152 notes

curiositycounts:

Striking fact: every 14 days, a language dies. 
There are more than 7,000 languages spoken on Earth and this rate more than half of those languages will be gone by 2100. National Geographic’s Enduring Languages project looks at the issue at length, including the regions that have created the languages —many of them not yet recorded—and the potential for them to disappear, taking with them a wealth of knowledge about history, culture, the natural environment, and the human brain. 
Read more and explore the interactive Languages Hot Spot map.

curiositycounts:

Striking fact: every 14 days, a language dies. 

There are more than 7,000 languages spoken on Earth and this rate more than half of those languages will be gone by 2100. National Geographic’s Enduring Languages project looks at the issue at length, including the regions that have created the languages —many of them not yet recorded—and the potential for them to disappear, taking with them a wealth of knowledge about history, culture, the natural environment, and the human brain. 

Read more and explore the interactive Languages Hot Spot map.

(Source: curiositycounts)

Filed under languages culture national geographic maps

12 notes

abbyjean:

Last year, more than one in 10 families received food stamps, with some states having significantly higher participation rates. In Oregon, the share was nearly one in five. Here’s a map showing what share of families in each state received these benefits to help them buy food. (via NYTimes.com)

abbyjean:

Last year, more than one in 10 families received food stamps, with some states having significantly higher participation rates. In Oregon, the share was nearly one in five. Here’s a map showing what share of families in each state received these benefits to help them buy food. (via NYTimes.com)

Filed under food stamps maps new york times snap

45 notes

sunfoundation:

 Mapping U.S. Foreign Debt: How Much We Owe and to Whom

Our goal with this visualization was to show which countries are  lending us money and to let people interact with data on a country by  country basis to see how this lending has changed over time. For  example, mousing over the large dot on China shows that Chinese lending  to the United States has gone from $59 billion ten years ago to more  than $1.15 trillion today, or one quarter of the total foreign owned  debt of $4.45 trillion.

sunfoundation:

Mapping U.S. Foreign Debt: How Much We Owe and to Whom

Our goal with this visualization was to show which countries are lending us money and to let people interact with data on a country by country basis to see how this lending has changed over time. For example, mousing over the large dot on China shows that Chinese lending to the United States has gone from $59 billion ten years ago to more than $1.15 trillion today, or one quarter of the total foreign owned debt of $4.45 trillion.

Filed under maps u.s. debt economy Sunlight Foundation u.s. foreign debt visuals

518 notes

thepoliticalnotebook:

A BBC map detailing the drought in the Horn of Africa shows the incredibly large percentage of the Horn that is in danger. It also shows that the worst effects are concentrated in the South: the Al-Shabaab controlled areas.
This is particularly bad news, because Al-Shabaab, Somalia’s notoriously brutal Al Qaeda cell, is denying that there is a famine at all. Their spokesman, Ali Mohamud Rage said yesterday that the idea that there was a famine was “utter nonsense, 100 percent baseless and sheer propaganda.”  They say their ban on aid groups in the areas under their control would remain in effect. Meanwhile, nearly half of the Somali population faces a crisis that UN Secretary General Ban Ki-Moon said will take $300 million to address.
Read more at Al Jazeera and the BBC.

thepoliticalnotebook:

A BBC map detailing the drought in the Horn of Africa shows the incredibly large percentage of the Horn that is in danger. It also shows that the worst effects are concentrated in the South: the Al-Shabaab controlled areas.

This is particularly bad news, because Al-Shabaab, Somalia’s notoriously brutal Al Qaeda cell, is denying that there is a famine at all. Their spokesman, Ali Mohamud Rage said yesterday that the idea that there was a famine was “utter nonsense, 100 percent baseless and sheer propaganda.”  They say their ban on aid groups in the areas under their control would remain in effect. Meanwhile, nearly half of the Somali population faces a crisis that UN Secretary General Ban Ki-Moon said will take $300 million to address.

Read more at Al Jazeera and the BBC.

Filed under maps somalia horn of africa drought al qaeda al jazeera bbc

67 notes

sunfoundation:

Persons Living with an HIV Diagnosis

AIDSVu provides a high-resolution view of the geography of HIV in the  United States, 30 years into the epidemic. It is an online tool that  allows users to visually explore the HIV epidemic alongside critical  resources such as HIV testing center locations and NIH-Funded HIV  Prevention & Vaccine Trials Sites.
The data on AIDSVu come from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) national HIV surveillance database that is comprised of HIV surveillance reports from state and local health departments. AIDSVu will be updated on an ongoing basis in conjunction with CDC’s annual release of HIV surveillance data, as well as new data and additional information as they become available. A Technical Advisory Group was brought together during the development of AIDSVu and an Advisory Committee, chaired by Dr. Jim Curran, Dean of the Rollins School of Public Health of Emory University, is comprised of key stakeholders who provide oversight and guidance for the ongoing project.

sunfoundation:

Persons Living with an HIV Diagnosis

AIDSVu provides a high-resolution view of the geography of HIV in the United States, 30 years into the epidemic. It is an online tool that allows users to visually explore the HIV epidemic alongside critical resources such as HIV testing center locations and NIH-Funded HIV Prevention & Vaccine Trials Sites.

The data on AIDSVu come from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) national HIV surveillance database that is comprised of HIV surveillance reports from state and local health departments. AIDSVu will be updated on an ongoing basis in conjunction with CDC’s annual release of HIV surveillance data, as well as new data and additional information as they become available. A Technical Advisory Group was brought together during the development of AIDSVu and an Advisory Committee, chaired by Dr. Jim Curran, Dean of the Rollins School of Public Health of Emory University, is comprised of key stakeholders who provide oversight and guidance for the ongoing project.

(via todayinpolitics)

Filed under health HIV AIDS maps

14 notes

sunfoundation:

Visualizing Early Washington: A Digital Reconstruction of the Capital ca. 1814

The task of visualizing early Washington DC has proven to be more challenging than anticipated. Technology is not the problem; the problem is lack of reliable historical evidence. The IRC has worked with architectural historians, cartographers, engineers, and ecologists to assess the often-unreliable eyewitness accounts and to recreate a “best guess” glimpse of the early city. The project and research are ongoing.

(via neighborhoodr-washingtondc)

Filed under dc maps videos history