media girl

Capturing bits & pieces on media, politics, culture & daily life

0 notes

15 Economic Facts About Millennials

Millennials, the cohort of Americans born between 1980 and the mid-2000s, are the largest generation in the U.S., representing one-third of the total U.S. population in 2013. With the first cohort of Millennials only in their early thirties, most members of this generation are at the beginning of their careers and so will be an important engine of the economy in the decades to come.

Interesting read: 15 economic facts about millennials

1. Millennials are now the largest, most diverse generation in the U.S. population.

2. Millennials have been shaped by technology.

3. Millennials value community, family, and creativity in their work.

4. Millennials have invested in human capital more than previous generations.

5. College-going Millennials are more likely to study social science and applied fields.

6. As college enrollments grow, more students rely on loans to pay for post-secondary education.

7. Millennials are more likely to focus exclusively on studies instead of combining school and work.

8. As a result of the Affordable Care Act, Millennials are much more likely to have health insurance coverage during their young adult years.

9. Millennials will contend with the effects of starting their careers during a historic downturn for years to come.

10. Investments in human capital are likely to have a substantial payoff for Millennials.

11. Working Millennials are staying with their early-career employers longer.

12. Millennial women have more labor market equality than previous generations.

13. Millennials tend to get married later than previous generations.

14. Millennials are less likely to be homeowners than young adults in previous generations.

15. College-educated Millennials have moved into urban areas faster than their less educated peers.

Filed under millennials economics

159 notes

My brother, in almost every conversation we’ve ever had about work, he’s always said to me, “You have to be humble.” I mean, the job of a reporter is kind of omnidirectional self-abasement, right? You’re going to experts who know more than you about the thing in its kind of structural terms. You’re going to people who are being affected by it in ways that you aren’t, so they know more about how it feels and how it’s working in a way, and certainly their lives, than you do. You’re going to an editor who has a better sense than you do for story structure and how things need to be if they’re going to work. You’re going to readers who ultimately are the judge of your success. I mean it’s a funny position in that way, because you really need to be able to learn from all kinds of different people.
Ezra Klein, Editor in Chief of Vox.com in Esquire’s The Mentorship Project, a series of fifty interviews with men about the mentors who made them who they are today. (via futurejournalismproject)

Filed under ezra klein the mentorship project

15 notes

socialmediadesk:

Above is an example of why you should always dig back and find an original tweet to RT, instead of using MT. If you notice, the tweet changes between examples one and two — meaning the 100+ people who retweeted the second tweet are passing along incorrect information.
Be skeptical of a RT unless you can track down the original tweet.
“If you haven’t tracked down the original tweet and confirmed what it actually says, you might be passing on misinformation AND putting misinformation in someone else’s mouth.” - Daniel Victor 
Thank you to Daniel Victor from The New York Times for granting permission to share this image.

socialmediadesk:

Above is an example of why you should always dig back and find an original tweet to RT, instead of using MT. If you notice, the tweet changes between examples one and two — meaning the 100+ people who retweeted the second tweet are passing along incorrect information.

Be skeptical of a RT unless you can track down the original tweet.

If you haven’t tracked down the original tweet and confirmed what it actually says, you might be passing on misinformation AND putting misinformation in someone else’s mouth.” - Daniel Victor 

Thank you to Daniel Victor from The New York Times for granting permission to share this image.

Filed under twitter social media news